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Glossary

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Alpine
Climbing or
Mountaineering
Alpine climbing or mountaineering is any mountain climb that requires more technical skills than hiking. The sport originated in the French and Swiss Alps. The technical climbing skills needed in alpine climbing include: rock, snowy slopes and glaciers. Alpine climbing can be dangerous because of the unpredictable hazards the climber may encounter, such as, rock falls, lightning and other bad weather, altitude sickness and fatigue.
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Backpacking
A hike lasting at least one overnight on which the hiker carries all the equipment, clothes and food needed.
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Bouldering Bouldering is climbing without ropes very close to the ground, where falls are very short and usually inconsequential. Boulderers practice very difficult moves on small outcrops or boulders, often trying many times before succeeding on a given boulder problem. Some use bouldering as practice for bigger climbs; others pursue it exclusively as a rewarding sport in its own right.
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Expedition A long trek to a specific destination. On an expedition the quantity of equipment and food needed exceeds the ability of the expedition members to carry all the gear at one time. The trip is broken into segments. The expedition members carry as much gear as possible across one segment, then return to the start of the segment to portage more equipment. The process continues until all the gear is moved across the segment. The process is repeated for each segment.
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Hiking A leisurely walk lasting one day or less.
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Rock Climbing Rock climbs that are protected primarily with the gear that climbers place and remove themselves are traditional climbs. Traditional climbing is how the sport has been practiced for decades, and it's still what most climbers do most of the time, although many now also practice sport climbing (see below). Confusingly, some traditional climbs may have an occasional fixed piton or bolt, and they often have fixed anchors for belays or rappels. However, traditional climbers are always prepared to arrange most of their own protection.
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Tea House Trekking Teahouse Trekking is a trek on which the trekker stays in private lodges along an established route. The trekker may have his own porters, but the trekker does not have control over what is cooked, who cooks it and when. Many lodges are filled with world travelers. Many lodges are attractive and well run. The main advantage of teahouse trekking is that it is less expensive. The main disadvantages are the lack of flexibility and difficulties with privacy and hygiene. Teahouse trekking and full trekking are quite different styles and will appeal to different people.
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Trekking Webster defines a trek as a slow or arduous journey. To trekker's it is a long, multi day trip undertaken by a group of people usually lead by a guide. All the equipment and food required is carried with the group. The group may contain professional porters and cooks. The group camps in tents each night.
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